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In Memoriam – October 2020

November 5th, 2020 6 comments

 

Do you hear the people sing? The remarkable man who wrote those words for the musical Les Misérables died in October, as did two triple-named country outlaw legends, two reggae pioneers, and three men who gave their names to eminent bands. Fans of The Originals will enjoy hearing the first recordings of hits for Waylon Jennings (I’m A Ramblin’ Man), Willie Nelson (Whiskey River) and the classic Mr Bojangles.

The Professor
In his young days, Spencer Davis almost casually came into contact with future music legends, a status he himself attained before he was 30. One of his early bands included future Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman (then still William Perks). Then he got a girlfriend called Christine Perfect, who as Christine McVie became a creative force in Fleetwood Mac. And in 1963, Davis discovered 15-year-old Stevie Winwood and roped him and Stevie’s brother Muff into the band that would became the Spencer Davis Group. The band would rack up for UK Top 10 hits and two consecutive UK #1s, all with Stevie on vocals, all ’60s classics, especially Keep On Running and Gimme Some Lovin’.

The band stopped running in 1969, after Stevie had decamped to form Traffic two years earlier. Davis, known by many as “Professor” due to his university education — he had studied German, a language in which the band recorded a couple of novelty records — went to the US and recorded a couple of success-evading albums, reformed an iteration of the Spencer Davis Group to little interest. By the mid-1970s he was working as an executive for Island Records.

The Axeman
Confession time: much as I admire the technical skills and acknowledge the influence of the guitar soloing of Eddie Van Halen, they never were my cup of vodka & coke. Of course they were quite breathtaking in their technique, as is the expertise in synchronised swimming. But that should not detract from how they, and Eddie’s band, practically set the 1980s “hair rock” craze in motion. Eddie was one of the pivotal figures in rock history, and also in pop: his guitar solo on Michael Jackson’s Beat It, which at the time sounded super-hard, helped metal cross over into pop.

The Soul-Reggae Pioneer
Soul singer Johnny Nash was one of the pioneers of reggae in the UK especially. A superb soul singer, Nash recorded since he was 18 in 1958, but the decisive event was when he moved to Jamaica in the 1965. There he was influenced by the rising rocksteady scene, and recorded in that genre himself. That fusion of what would become known as reggae and US soul brought Nash three Top 10 hits in the UK in 1968/69. Three years later he had a #13 hit with a version of Stir It Up, the song by Bob Marley, who still had to break internationally. But soon came Nash’s own anthem: the much-covered I Can See Clearly Now. Another three years later, he topped the UK charts with the lilting reggae-soul number Tears On My Pillow. But that style wasn’t his only trick: Nash also released some very good soul albums, until he semi-retired from the music business in 1980.

The Drumming Centenarian
We have featured several centenarians over the years, but was any as old as 107? That is the age jazz drummer Viola Smith reached before she died five weeks short of her 108th. Her career went back to the 1920s when her concert hall-owner father set up his eight daughters in an all-girl band which he called the Schmitz Sisters Family Orchestra (later Smith Sisters Orchestra). As her five elder sisters chose all the instruments Viola wanted to play, she settled for drums. The band broke out in the early 1930s, but by 1938 Viola and sister Mildred formed their own all-female swing band, The Coquettes, which lasted till Mildred got married in 1942. Viola then joined the Hour of Charm Orchestra, also all-female, in which she earned the reputation of being “the female Gene Krupa”. All these bands, and some that followed, were stage acts who didn’t put their music to record.

Not surprisingly, starting in the early ‘40s, Viola advocated for equality between men and women in music. In an interview on her 107th birthday last year, Smith said she still drummed on stage occasionally.

The Gospel-Soul Man
In the 1970s, few gospel groups crossed over as well as The Rance Allen Group, a band of three brothers led by, you guessed it, Rance Allen. The lyrics might have been about the Christian faith, though even then many could be taken as inspirational, but the music was soul; channeling Chi-Lites or Sly Stone rather than Andrae Crouch. Indeed, in their performance at the legendary Wattstax festival, Rance and brothers referenced Dance To The Music after delivering a shredding guitar solo. In that way, the group paved the way for acts like Kirk Franklin and The Winans.

Rance himself was a powerful singer with a great range; he could sing ballads and also hit the high notes like the funkiest soul screamer. Later was made a bishop in his church.

The Mr Bojangles Writer
Outlaw country singer-songwriter Jerry Jeff Walker will always be remembered for writing the great Mr Bojangles, a song about a street performer whom he met in a holding cell in 1965. The story of that featured in The Originals: The Classics. Walker never reached the heights of fellow Outlaw singers, like Willie Nelson or Waylon Jennings, but he was influential enough to receive a namecheck in Jennings’ Luckenbach, Texas (“Between Hank Williams’ pain songs and Jerry Jeff’s train songs…”).

The Other Outlaw
It was a bad month indeed for outlaw country musicians with three names: shortly after Walker, Billy Joe Shaver died (David Allen Coe and Michael Martin Murphey must be getting nervous now). Like Walker, Shaver was a collaborator with Waylon Jennings. And where Jennings was namechecked by Jennings, Shaver was mentioned in song by Bob Dylan (on 2009’s I Feel a Change Comin’ On). Shaver recorded 17 studio albums in his time, but he was especially prolific as a songwriter whose compositions were recorded by other big names in country.  As it happens, Jerry Jeff Walker was among them, featuring here with one of Shaver’s finest songs.

Shaver certainly was a character: In 2007, he shot a fellow named Billy Bryant Coker in the face with a handgun. Luckily, Coker’s injuries weren’t life-threatening. Shaver said he had acted in self-defence after Coker threatened him with a knife. According to witnesses, Shaver had asked Coker before shooting: “Where do you want it?” Having shot the guy, he demanded: “Tell me you are sorry. Nobody tells me to shut up.” Some years later Shaver told NPR that Coker indeed said “I’m sorry” after being shot. The singer said that Coker had been a bully and “I hit him right between a mother and a fucker.” A court acquitted Shaver.

The Writer
Here’s a thought: the same guy who wrote the lyrics for the silly novelty records by Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren in the early 1960s (including the vaguely racist Goodness Gracious Me) later wrote the profound and moving lyrics for the musical Les Misérables. South African-born English writer Herbert Kretzmer (whose brother went on to become mayor of Johannesburg) also wrote the English lyrics for the Charles Aznavour hit She, the Streisand favourite When You Gotta Go, the much-covered Yesterday When I Was Young, and — within hours of John F Kennedy’s assassination — the tribute song In The Summer Of His Years.

Kretzmer was also an award-winning journalist in Britain, as a long-running TV critic and as an interviewer of the likes of John Steinbeck, Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, Sugar Ray Robinson, Louis Armstrong, Henry Miller, Cary Grant and Duke Ellington.

As before, this post is included in PDF format in the package.

Lisa Schouw, South African-born singer of Australian band Girl Overboard, on Oct. 2
Girl Overboard – Wrap Your Arms Around Me (1989, also as co-writer)

Cookie Monsta, 31, British dubstep producer, on Oct. 2

Anthony Galindo, 41, Venezuelan singer, suicide on Oct. 3

Béatrice Arnac, 89, French singer, composer and actress, on Oct. 5
Béatrice Arnac – Athée ou à Té (1973)

Eddie Van Halen, 65, Dutch-born guitarist, composer, co-founder of Van Halen, on Oct. 6
Van Halen – Ain’t Talkin’ Bout Love (1978)
Nicolette Larson – Can’t Get Away From You (1979, on guitar)
Michael Jackson – Beat It (1982, on guitar)
Van Halen – Hot For Teacher (1984)

Johnny Nash, 80, singer-songwriter, on Oct. 6
Johnny Nash – Love Ain’t Nothin’ (1964)
Johnny Nash – You Got Soul (1968)
Johnny Nash – Say It Ain’t True (1975)
Ray Charles – I Can See Clearly Now (1978, as writer)

Bunny Lee, 79, Jamaican reggae producer, on Oct. 6
Delroy Wilson – Better Must Come (1971, as writer and producer)
Eric Donaldson – Cherry Oh Baby (1971, as producer)

Reverend John Wilkins, 76, blues musician, on Oct. 6
Reverend John Wilkins – Trouble (2020) ORDER

Ray Pennington, 86, country singer-songwriter, in a fire on Oct. 7
Ray Pennington – Ramblin’ Man (1967, also as writer)

Brian Locking, 81, bassist with British guitar band The Shadows (1962-63), on Oct. 8
The Shadows – Dance On (1963)
Donovan – Catch The Wind (1965, on bass)

Pierre Kezdy, 58, punk bass player, on Oct. 9

David Refael ben Ami, 70, Israeli singer, COVID-19 on Oct. 9

Harold Betters, 92, jazz trombonist, on Oct. 11
Harold Betters – Do Anything You Wanna (1969)

Kim Massie, 63, blues singer, on Oct. 12

Saint Dog, 44, rapper with Kottonmouth Kings, on Oct. 13
Kottonmouth Kings – Life Ain’t What It Seems (1998)

Paul Matters, bassist of AC/DC (1975), on Oct. 14

Herbert Kretzmer, 95, South African-born lyricist, on Oct. 14
Peter Sellers & Sophia Loren – Bangers & Mash (1961, as lyricist)
Dusty Springfield – Yesterday When I Was Young (1972, as lyricst)
Charles Aznavour – She (1974, as lyricist)
Les Misérables Cast (London) – One Day More (1985, as lyricist)

Dave Munden, 76, English drummer and singer with The Tremeloes, on Oct. 15
The Tremeloes – Even The Bad Times Are Good (1967)
The Tremeloes – Me And My Life

Johnny Bush, 85, country singer-songwriter, on Oct. 16
Johnny Bush – Whiskey River (1972, also as co-writer)

Toshinori Kondo, 71, Japanese avant garde jazz trumpeter, on Oct. 17

Gordon Haskell, 74, English singer-songwriter and musician, on Oct. 17
King Crimson – Lady Of The Dancing Water (1970l, as member on bass)
Gordon Haskell – How Wonderful You Are (2001)

José Padilla, 64, Spanish DJ, producer of Café del Mar CDs, on Oct. 18
José Padilla feat. Angela John – Who Do You Love (1998)

Chet ‘JR’ White, 40, bassist with Indie band Girls, producer, on Oct. 18
Girls – Lust For Life (2009, also as producer)

Alfredo Cerruti, 78, Italian producer, singer, author, on Oct. 18

Tony Lewis, 62, bassist, songwriter with English band The Outfield, on Oct. 19
The Outfield – Your Love (1985)

Overton Berry, 84, jazz pianist, on Oct. 19

Spencer Davis, 81, Welsh musician, on Oct. 19
Spencer Davis Group – Keep On Running (1965)
Spencer Davis Group – Det war in Schöneberg (1966)
Spencer Davis Group – Mr Second Class (1969)

Viola Smith, 107, American drummer, on Oct. 21
The Coquettes – The Snake Charmer (1939)

Margie Bowes, 79, country singer, on Oct. 22
Margie Bowes – Poor Old Heartsick Me (1959)

Jerry Jeff Walker, 78, country singer-songwriter, on Oct. 23
Jerry Jeff Walker – Mr. Bojangles (1968)
Jerry Jeff Walker – Stoney (1970)
Jerry Jeff Walker – L.A. Freeway (1972)
Jerry Jeff Walker – Pissin’ In The Wind (1975)

Cal Vin, 35, Zimbabwean singer and rapper, in a hit-and-run on Oct. 24

Stan Kesler, 92, songwriter, musician and producer, on Oct. 26
Elvis Presley with Scotty & Bill – I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (1955, as writer)
Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs – Wooly Bully (1965, as producer)

Dolores Abril, 86, Spanish folkloric singer, on Oct. 26

Cano Estremera, 62, Puerto Rican salsa singer, on Oct. 27

Billy Joe Shaver, 81, country singer and songwriter, on Oct. 27
Billy Joe Shaver – Black Rose (1973)
The Allman Brothers Band – Sweet Mama (1975, as writer)
Jerry Jeff Walker – Old Five And Dimers Like Me (1976, as writer)
Billy Joe Shaver with Kris Kristofferson – No Earthly Good (2007)

Lou Pallo, 86, guitarist with Les Paul and His Trio, on Oct. 27

James Broad, singer, guitarist, songwriter with UK indie band Silver Sun, on Oct. 30
Silver Sun – Golden Skin (1997)

Rance Allen, 71, gospel singer and bandleader, on Oct. 31
The Rance Allen Group – There’s Gonna Be A Showdown (1972)
The Rance Allen Group – Up Above My Head (1972, live at Wattstax)
The Rance Allen Group – Harlem Heaven (1975)
The Rance Allen Group – Some People (1980)

Marc Fosset, 71, French jazz guitarist, on Oct. 31

Sean Connery, 90, Scottish actor, on Oct. 31
Janet Munro & Sean Connery – Pretty Irish Girl (1959)

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In Memoriam – September 2020

October 1st, 2020 4 comments

This was a relentlessly nasty month, as the number of 12 write-ups shows — in a month when I really didn’t have much time for that! It was particularly bad for soul singers and bassists. Still listing deaths from Covid-19, because as the orange commander of the Proud Stormtroopers said: “It is what it is.”

The Reggae Legend
To reggae fans, the question of Maytals or Wailers is akin to pop fans arguing about Beatles or Stones. Certainly, the Maytals’ leader Toots Hibbert, who has died at 71, was the one to give the genre its name with his 1968 song Do The Reggay. A gifted multi-instrumentalist — it is said he could play every instrument on his records — Hibbert was also a superb vocalist. Had he been born in the US, he might have been a soul singer. Having grown up in a Christian family before turning to Rastafarianism, he had a background in gospel music, which also found expression in some of his lyrics.

The Inspiration for Michelle
The incredible 93-years-long life of French chanteuse and actress Juliette Gréco has come to an end. As a teenager in occupied France during World War II, Juliette was involved in the Resistance, with her mother and sister. All three were arrested. Juliette was tortured by the Gestapo, but evaded internment in a concentration camp, unlike the other two. Instead, the 16-year-old was kept in jail for several month.

After the war, Gréco became part of the bohemian scene is Paris’ St Germain district (now more famous, alas, as the oligarch propaganda plaything football club owned by the state of Qatar), where she joined up with people like Sartre, Camus and Cocteau (who gave Gréco her first film role). In the 1960s, she was the inspiration for Paul McCartney’s song Michelle.

Gréco had a string of high-profile affairs (with, among others, Miles Davis, Quincy Jones, Sacha Distel, and Albert Camus), was married three times, and received the highest honours France bestows on civilians.

The Brother of Kool
Ronald Bell co-founded the legendary Kool & The Gang with his brother Robert, whose nickname gave the band its name. And while “Kool” gave his name to the band, Ronald was a musical force behind it, as a saxophonist, as a songwriter and as a producer. He wrote such classics as Jungle Boogie, Open Sesame, Ladies’ Night, Get Down On It, Big Fun, Hi-De-Hi Hi-De-Ho, In The Heart, Cherish, and Celebration. The latter was the song Bell regarded as his favourite, having been inspired to write it after picking up a bible in a hotel room. And that is interesting since Bell was a convert to Islam who took the name Khalis Bayyan.

The Honey Cone
On September 10 I posted the ABC of Soul Music mix, on which the letter H was represented by The Honey Cone. Two days later the lead singer of the featured track, Want Ads, died. Edna Wright, the younger sister of Darlene Love, started out as a backing singer for the likes of The Righteous Brothers, Johnny Rivers, and Ray Charles.

She released one unsuccessful single under the name Sandy Wynns, but her break came when Holland-Dozier-Holland, fresh from leaving Motown, discovered Wright as she filled in for her sister on the Andy Williams Show in 1969. Wright declined a solo deal but took the lead in The Honey Cone. Two years later the group had two mega hits with Want Ads and Stick-Up. After the Honey Cone, she resumed her career as backing singer, but did release one solo LP in 1977, the title track of which features here.

She Was Woman
With her hit I Am Woman, Australian-born singer Helen Reddy carved her name into the pantheon of female singers who articulated the demand for the emancipation of women. It was all the more powerful a statement in a time of rising feminism that Reddy didn’t look like the caricature of bra-burning activists that scared the supposedly silent majority; she actually looked like one of them — as did many other feminists. For a generation of women, I Am Woman (written by a man) became a statement of self-assertion.

The Australian-born singer had her first hit in 1970 with her second single, I Don’t Know How To Love Him, from Jesus Christ Superstar. It was actually the b-side of a track called I Believe In Music, written by Mac Davis, who died on the same day as Reddy. Many more hits followed, especially Delta Dawn, over the next decade. Reddy retired from the music business in 2002, returned to Australia, and became a hypnotherapist there.

The Humble Singer
Before he made it as a country singer, Mac Davis was a songwriter — and he started with quite a splash. For Elvis he wrote several tracks, including In the Ghetto (originally offered to Sammy Davis Jr, who’d record it a year later), Don’t Cry Daddy, and A Little Less Conversation. He also wrote the above-mentioned I Believe In Music, which eventually became a hit for Gallery.

In the mid-1970s he became a singing star, with hits like Baby Don’t Get Hooked on Me, One Hell Of A Woman, Stop And Smell The Roses, and Rock ‘n’ Roll (I Gave You the Best Years of My Life). But perhaps his most famous song is a novelty sing-along number, It’s Hard To Be Humble.

The Cash Drummer
As Johnny Cash’s long-time drummer, W.S. ‘Fluke’ Holland can be heard on most of the great man’s classic recordings, starting in 1960, when Holland joined Cash’s Tennessee Three. Holland was the last survivor of the original trio, with guitarist Luther Perkins having died in 1968, and bassist Marshall Grant in 2011 (Perkins’ successors, Carl Perkins and Bob Wootton are also dead).

Before joining Cash, Holland was drumming at Sun Records for Carl Perkins on such classics as Blue Suede Shoes, Honey Don’t, and Matchbox, and he was the drummer on duty when the Million Dollar Quartet — Perkins, Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis (Cash only came in to say hello) — recorded their famous session.

The Jersey Boy
As a founder member of what would become The 4 Seasons, Tommy DeVito was one of the two older guys in the group, along with Nick Massi (Frankie Valli and Bob Gaudio were more than ten years younger). The baritone vocalist and lead guitarist was there when his group took in the teenage Valli, and he was still there when other members were replaced by Gaudio and Massi. And DiVito was there throughout the big times of The 4 Seasons until 1970, when he sold his rights to the band’s name to Gaudio and Valli.

The Emotion
Three days before the 21st day of September, Pamela Hutchinson of The Emotions died at 61. The surprising thing is just how young she was in the soul band’s heyday, when they were produced by Maurice and Stephen Stepney of Earth, Wind & Fire. Her sisters and fellow Emotions Wanda and Sheila were 5-7 years older than her, and Pamela joined in 1977 only when older sister Jeanette left the trio to have a child.

The timing was good for Pamela: The Emotions, who had already made a mark by appearing in the 1973 Wattstax concert, were getting ready to make some soul classics, especially the impossibly joyous Best Of My Love and Boogie Wonderland with EWF. For The Emotions, that was the zenith. After 1978’s Sunbeam album, Jeanette returned to the group, and Pamela carried on as a backing singer for other acts.

The Marvel
Georgia Dobbins career stopped before it could even begin — and yet she left an indelible mark on music history. In the early 1960s, Dobbins was the lead singer of the girl-group that would find fame as The Marvelettes. And with her high school friends in what was still The Marvels, Dobbins auditioned at the still young Motown label. Berry Gordy was interested but sent the group away with the advice to write their own songs.

Dobbins took that advice. She asked her friend William Garrett for an unfinished song he had written, and with his permission reworked it to create Please Mr Postman. But before Dobbins could record it with the newly-renamed Marvellettes (and Marvin Gaye on the drums), she bowed to her father’s wishes and left the music industry before she could even enter it. But her song became a mega-hit in 1961 for her old friends, and Motown first chart-topper. It was later covered by The Beatles and the Carpenters. It was also recycled for a song titled, presumably by Dan Quayle, Mashed Potatoe Time, for which Dobbins got a writing credit.

For many years, Dobbins kept her contribution to music history quiet. In fact, she felt that she had let her old friends down by leaving the group…

The Impeacher
Soul singer Roy C Hammond had a long career in soul music without ever quite reaching legendary status. His 1965 song Shotgun Wedding was a Top 10 hit in the UK, and it has been covered by the likes of Rod Stewart. In 1973 he wrote a song about Richard Nixon titled, reasonably enough, Impeach The President, which he recorded with a group of kids called The Honey Drippers. It became one of the most sampled records, including on Janet Jackson’s mega hit That’s The Way Love Goes and Mary J Blige’s Real Love (for which he even got a co-writing credit).

In his later years, Roy C pretty much stuck to themes of sex and infidelity, with all the amorous joys and suffering that involves (let’s say that Roy C was not a militant feminist), with the occasional shot of social commentary.

The Roller
His contribution to rock & roll was negligible, but for two years Ian Mitchell lived what looked like a dream but probably was more of a nightmare. Mitchell was only 17 when he became the bassist of the Bay City Rollers in 1976, just at the end of Rollermania. He replaced co-founder Alan Longmuir, who left the band after being burnt out. Longmuir, who died at 70 in 2018, was a decade older and thus much more mature than the Mitchell, and he couldn’t handle the pressure, so the teenager didn’t really stand a chance. Within less than a year, Mitchell quit the Bay City Rollers in what was an acrimonious split. Mitchell then rejoined his old band from Northern Ireland, Rosetta Stone, who were also managed by the Rollers’ sex-pest manager Tam Paton. Touted as the next big teen band sensation, Rosetta Stone had a couple of minor hits in Europe before Mitchell jumped ship in 1979, and soon after rejoined the now over-the-hill Rollers. He would release a few records intermittently — the last a Christmas album in 2001 — but to no great attention.

 

Erick Morillo, 49, house DJ, producer and label owner, on Sept. 1
Reel 2 Real feat. The Mad Stuntman – I Like To Move It (1993, as Reel 2 Real)

Ian Mitchell, 62, Irish bassist, on Sept. 1
Bay City Rollers – Yesterday’s Hero (1976, as member)
Rosetta Stone – (If Paradise Is) Half As Nice (1977, as member)

Alexander Priko, 46, singer, keyboardist with Soviet dance group Laskovyi Mai, on Sept. 2

Bill Pursell, 94, composer and pianist, of Covid-19 on Sept. 3
Bill Pursell – Our Winter Love (1963)

Lucille Starr, 82, Canadian country singer, on Sept. 4
Lucille Starr – Cajun Love (1968)

Gary Peacock, 85, jazz double-bassist, on Sept. 4
Robert Kaddouch/Gary Peacock – Gary’s Line (2016)

Sterling “Mr Satan” Magee, 84, soul and blues singer, Covid-19 on Sept. 6
Sterling Magee – Keep On (1965)

Bruce Williamson, 49, singer with The Temptations (2006-15), Covid-19 on Sept. 6

Simeon Coxe, 82, synth-player of electro-rock band Silver Apples, on Sept. 8
Silver Apples – You And I (1968)

Sid McCray, singer of reggae-punk band Bad Brains, on Sept. 9
Bad Brains – Stay Close To Me (1980)

Ronald Bell, 68, saxophonist of Kool & the Gang, songwriter, producer, on Sept. 9
Kool & the Gang – Chocolate Buttermilk (1970)
Kool & The Gang – Jungle Boogie (1973, also as writer)
Kool & The Gang – Get Down On It (1979, also as writer)
Kool & the Gang – Big Fun (1982, also as writer)

Roberto Franco, 75, Argentine singer-songwriter and guitarist, Covid-19 on Sept. 10

Diana Rigg, 82, English actress and sometime singer, on Sept. 10
Diana Rigg – Forget Yesterday (1972)

Toots Hibbert, 77, Jamaican reggae pioneer singer and songwriter, on Sept. 11
The Maytals – Do The Reggay (1968)
Toots & The Maytals – Louie Louie (1972)
Toots & The Maytals – Pressure Drop (live) (1980)
Toots & The Maytals with Willie Nelson – Still Is Still Moving To Me (2004)

Reggie Johnson, 79, jazz double-bassist, on Sept. 11
Art Blakey & The New Jazz Messengers – Buttercorn Lady (1966, on double-bass)

Edna Wright, 76, singer with soul band Honey Cone, on Sept. 12
Sandy Wynns – The Touch Of Venus (1964, pseudonym)
Honey Cone – While You’re Out Looking For Sugar (1969)
Honey Cone – Blessed Be Our Love (1971)
Edna Wright – Oops! Here I Go Again (1977)

Joaquín Carbonell, 73, Spanish singer-songwriter and poet, Covid-19 on Sept. 12

Peter Starkie, 72, Australian rock guitarist, on Sept. 14

Al Kasha, 83, Oscar-winning songwriter, on Sept. 14
Aretha Franklin – Operation Heartbreak (1961, as co-writer)
Maureen McGovern – The Morning After (1972, as co-writer)

Alicia Maguiña, 81, Peruvian singer and composer, on Sept. 14

Doak Snead, 70, country singer-songwriter, on Sept. 16
Doak Snead – Come & Get Your Rock (2018)

Roy C Hammond, 81, soul singer-songwriter, on Sept. 16
Roy C – Shotgun Wedding (1965, also as writer)
The Honey Drippers – Impeach The President (1973, as writer and producer)
Roy C – Great, Great Grandson Of A Slave (1977)
Roy ‘C’ – I’m Not Going To Eat A Thing (1987)

Pamela Hutchinson, 61, singer with soul band The Emotions, on Sept. 18
The Emotions – Best Of My Love (1977)
The Emotions – My Everything (1978, also as co-writer)
Earth, Wind & Fire – Touch (1983, on backing vocals)

Georgia Dobbins, 78, early singer with The Marvelettes, songwriter, on Sept. 18
The Marvelettes – Please Mr. Postman (1961, as co-writer)
Johnny Halliday – Mashed Potatoe Time (1963, as co-writer)

Terry Clemson, lead guitarist of English blues-rock band Downliners Sect, on Set. 19
Downliners Sect – Don’t Lie To Me (1966)

Lee Kerslake, 73, English drummer of Uriah Heep, on Sept. 19
Uriah Heep – The Wizard (1972)
Uriah Heep – Free Me (1977)

Dave Kusworth, 60, member of English indie group Jacobites, on Sept. 19
Nikki Sudden & Dave Kusworth, The Jacobites – Shame For The Angels (1985)

Tommy DeVito, 92, founder member of The Four Seasons, Covid-19 on Sept. 21
The Four Lovers – You’re The Apple Of My Eye (1956)
The 4 Seasons – Bye, Bye, Baby (Baby Goodbye) (1964)
The 4 Seasons – Girl Come Running (1965)
Frankie Valli & The 4 Seasons – Any Day Now/Oh Happy Day (1970, on guitar solo)

Roy Head, 79, blue-eyed soul singer, on Sept. 21
Roy Head – Treat Her Right (1965)

Ira Sullivan, 89, jazz trumpeter, on Sept. 21
Ira Sullivan Quintet – When Sunny Gets Blue (1958; released 1970)

Ramona Galarza, 80, Argentine folk singer and actress, on Sept. 22

Gerson King Combo, 76, Brazilian funk singer, on Sept. 22
Gerson King Combo – Mandamentos Black (1977)

Juliette Gréco, 93, French singer and actress, on Sept. 23
Juliette Gréco – Sous Le Ciel de Paris (1951)
Juliette Gréco – Jolie Môme (Live at Olympia, 1966)
Juliette Gréco – Ta jalousie (1974)

S. Holland, 85, drummer with Johnny Cash’s Tennessee Three, on Sept. 23
Carl Perkins – Matchbox (1957, on drums)
Johnny Cash – Ring Of Fire (1963)
Johnny Cash – Big River (1968, live at St Quentin, on drums)

Guitar Crusher, 89, blues singer and guitarist, on Sept. 23
Guitar Crusher – Why Oh Why (1963)

Max Merritt, 79, New Zealand musician, on Sept. 24

Brent Young, founding bassist of metal band Trivium, on Sept. 25

Eddy Pumer, 72, guitarist of UK psychedelia band Kaleidoscope/Fairfield Parlour, on Sept. 25
Kaleidoscope – Flight From Ashiya (1967, also as co-writer)

Masayoshi Kabe, 70, Japanese bassist and guitarist, on Sept. 26

Jimmy Winston, 75, first keyboardist of the Small Faces and actor, on Sept. 26
Small Faces – What’Cha Gonna Do About It (1965)

Mark Stone, founding bassist of Van Halen, on Sept. 26

Jackie Dennis, 77, Scottish teenage pop singer, on Sept. 28
Jackie Dennis – La Dee Dah  (1958)

Geoff Swettenham, 72, drummer of Beatles protégés Grapefruit, on Sept. 28
Grapefruit – Dear Delilah (1968)

Mac Davis, 78, country singer-songwriter, on Sept. 29
Sammy Davis Jr – In The Ghetto (1970, as writer)
Mac Davies – Rock ‘N Roll (I Gave You The Best Years Of My Life) (1975)
Mac Davis – It’s Hard To Be Humble (1980)

Helen Reddy, 78, Australian-born singer, on Sept. 29
Helen Reddy – I Believe In Music (1970, written by Mac Davis)
Helen Reddy – Delta Dawn (1973)
Helen Reddy – Ain’t No Way To Treat A Lady (1975)

Rocco Prestia, 69, pioneering bassist with funk band Tower of Power, on Sept. 29
Tower Of Power – What Is Hip (1973)
Tower Of Power – You Ought To Be Having Fun (1976)

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In Memoriam – August 2020

September 3rd, 2020 7 comments

This month we lost one of my favourite contemporary singers, and one of the last survivor of the 1921 Tulsa pogrom. The latter died at 100 on August 18, when this list records seven music deaths in one day.

There’s a lot great music to discover this month; I am surprised that the drum break that opens Steve Grossman’s Zulu Stomp has not been widely sampled. As in the last few months, I’ve created playlists in order of the listings below, and a playlist I have made for myself. This month’s is particularly good.

The Saint Of Lost Causes
The law of averages dictate that most of our favourites musicians tend to die when they are past their prime. It’s very rare that I’m looking forward to the next album of a newly-departed performer, even in the case of somebody like Prince. But in August I was devastated by the sudden death of Justin Towne Earle, one of the few contemporary singers I’d call myself a fan of, more so even than I am of his father, Steve Earle.

He never made a bad album I heard, and his Harlem River Blues album is a contender for my favourite of the 2010s, and Track 2 from it, One More Night in Brooklyn, one of my favourites of the decade. Last year’s The Saint Of Lost Causes was solid with some fine moments. It has his typical warmth and tinge of sadness, and is an agreeable companion. Justin Townes Earle’s music is generally classified as “Americana”, and Earle did justice to the concept: he drew his influences from almost every musical genre of the USA.

Earle was just 38, younger even than the fine musician he was named after, Townes van Zandt. Police say it might have been a drug overdose that claimed Earle, and reportedly he had been on-and-off drugs since he was 12.

The Texan Mexican
Strange paths crossed with Trini Lopez, the son of Mexican person growing up in Texas. In the mid-1950s, Lopez and is band played in the Dallas nightclub owned by Jack Ruby, who’d later murder Harvey Oswald. Then it was Buddy Holly’s father at whose advice Lopez and his band, The Big Beats, were recorded by Buddy’s producer Norman Petty in 1957. They released one instrumental single, and Trini tried his hand at a solo career as a singer. A long string of singles went nowhere, and an idea for Trini to succeed Buddy Holly as the singer of The Crickets fell through. So he returned to club singing — where he was discovered in 1962 by Frank Sinatra.

Sinatra signed Lopez to his Reprise label, and Lopez rewarded Sinatra with a hit, a live recording of If I Had A Hammer. He continued to have a run of hit singles through the 1960s. In between that he designed two guitars for Gibson, both models now much sought-after by collectors, and appeared in a handful of movies, including The Dirty Dozen.

The Rock Opera Writer
We can thank Mark Wirtz and his collaborator Keith West for the concept of the rock opera, one which they pioneered in 1967 with their unfinished A Teenage Opera, from which West released the track often called Grocer Jack, which became a #2 hit in 1967. Wirtz — who was born in in the French city of Strasbourg, grew up in Cologne and moved to England in 1962 — also wrote and recorded the infectious A Touch Of Velvet-A Sting Of Brass in 1966 under the moniker Mood Mosaic (with vocals by The Ladybirds). It later served as the theme of the legendary German music TV show Musikladen.

In 1970 he moved to the US, where he arranged for a number of big-name acts, but left the business in the late 1970s. He tried his hands at various careers: working a telemarketer, maître d’, blood-stock agent, interpreter, voice-over artist, undercover agent, seminar leader and sales manager. He then moved into comedy, with success, and also became an award-winning newspaper columnist and writer.

The Pogrom Survivor
As a toddler, Hal “Cornbread” Singer survived the Tulsa race massacre, when whites razed a whole thriving district in the black suburb of Greenwood in a pogrom against African Americans. When he died at 100 on August 18, he was one of the last survivors of that act of genocide.

Singer grew up in Greenwood before he became a jazz musician, especially as a tenor saxophonist. He played with acts like Oran “Hot Lips” Page, Roy Eldridge, Marion Abernathy, Coleman Hawkins and Wynonie Harris and recorded under his own name, scoring a 1948 hit with the instrumental Corn Bread, which gave him his nickname.

The Hard Rock Producer
Martin Birch, who has died at 71, was a young recording engineer when he twiddled the buttons for the blues-era Fleetwood Mac, and more as they transitioned towards AOR (he played an acoustic guitar solo on their 1973 track Keep On Going, which he produced and has Christine McVie on vocals). But he made his name as the producer and engineer on all the great Deep Purple albums, and the successor bands such as Rainbow and Whitesnake. From Deep Purple he moved on to Iron Maiden, producing their golden 1980s run. He also worked on albums by Black Sabbath, Wayne County and Blue Öyster Cult.

The Mindbender
As the nominative frontman of ’60s British pop band The Mindbenders, Wayne Fontana has legitimate expectations of striking it big as a solo artist. So after a couple of UK Top 10 hits in 1964 and ‘65 (both featured here), Fontana left the band to go solo. While Fontana had a pair of Top 20 hits (on the Fontana label, coincidentally), the band he left behind scored a huge hit in 1966 with A Groovy Kind Of Love. That’s as good as it ever got for Fontana, by 1976 he quit the music business.

And if you ever thought Austin Powers was anything less than a documentary, listen to the Coca-Cola jingle featuring Fontana and The Mindbenders included in this collection.

The Last Hatchet Man
With Steve Holland, the last of the original line-up of Southern Rock outfit Molly Hatchet has died. The guitarist stuck with the band from its founding until a big fall-out moved Holland and two other members to drop out of a tour in 1983. Two decades later they joined up with former Molly Hatchet singer Jimmy Farrar to form Gator Country, named after their old band’s great 1978 song. They released one live album in 2008. All founding members of Gator Country are now all dead.

The Dealer
The contribution made by Cathy Smith to the canon of music is negligible — backing vocals for Hoyt Axton (harmonising with Nicolette Larsson) and Dan Hill — but her unexemplary life story is tied in with various acts, not always for the better. Born in 1947 in Canada, she went to the US as a teenager and hooked up with Levon Helms and his pre-Band group The Hawks, and then with members of The Band. When the paternity of her newborn couldn’t be established, the kid was known as “The Band Baby”. She had an on-off affair with fellow Canadian Gordon Lightfoot, whose big hit Sundown is about his troubled affair with Smith (the possessive Lightfoot was not just a victim of Smith’s wiles but also an abuser, once breaking Smith’s cheekbone).

In 1976 Smith became a heroin addict and dealer. Among her clients, according to Bob Woodward in his book Wired, were Ron Wood and Keith Richards. Another client was John Belushi, into whom she injected the drug cocktail that killed him. In a contender for Greatest Backfires of the 1980s, Smith gave an interview about it in the National Enquirer, under the headline “I killed John Belushi. I didn’t mean to, but I am responsible”. As a result of that, she was charged with murder and drug-dealing. Out on bail, she fled to Canada. She later served a 15-month sentence in a plea bargain.

 

Randy Barlow, 77, country singer, on July 30
Randy Barlow – No Sleep Tonight (1978)

Wilford Brimley, 85, actor and singer, on Aug. 1
Wilford Brimley – My Funny Valentine (1990)

Larry Novak, 87, jazz pianist, on Aug. 2

Steve Holland, 66, guitarist with Molly Hatchet, Gator Country, on Aug. 2
Molly Hatchet – Gator Country (1978)
Molly Hatchet – Bloody Reunion (1981)

Michael Peter Smith, 78, singer-songwriter and author, on Aug. 3
Steve Goodman – The Dutchman (1972, as writer)
Michael Smith – Three Monkeys (1987)

Tony Costanza, 52, drummer with metal bands Machine Head, Crowbar, on Aug. 4

Billy Goldenberg, 84, TV theme writer, musical director (Elvis ‘68), on Aug. 4
Barbra Streisand ‎- If I Close My Eyes (1973, as co-writer, arranger, producer)
Theme of ‘Kojak’ (full version) (1973, as writer)

FBG Duck, 26, rapper, shot dead on Aug. 4

Jan Savage, 77, guitarist of garage rock band The Seeds, on Aug. 5
The Seeds – Pushin’ Too Hard (1965)

Agathonas Iakovidis, 65, Greek folk singer, on Aug. 5
Koza Mostra & Agathonas Iakovidis – Alcohol Is Free (2013)

Vern Rumsey, 47, bassist and recording engineer, on Aug. 6

Wayne Fontana, 74, English singer, on Aug. 6
Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders – Um, Um, Um, Um (1964)
Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders – Game Of Love (1965)
Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders – Coca-Cola commercial (1960s)
Wayne Fontana – Pamela, Pamela (1966)

Mark Wirtz, 76, French-born musician and producer, on Aug. 7
Mood Mosaic – A Touch Of Velvet-A Sting Of Brass (1966)
Keith West – Excerpt From ‘A Teenage Opera’ (1967, as co-writer, producer)

Alain Delorme, 70, French singer, on Aug. 7
Alain Delorme – Romantique avec toi (1975)

Paul Dokter, 59, singer, guitarist of Dutch indie band The Serenes, on Aug.7
The Serenes – Rebecca (You’re Gonna Be Alright) (1990)

Martin Birch, 71, British producer and engineer. On Aug. 9
Deep Purple – Hush (1968, as engineer)
Fleetwood Mac – Keep On Going (1973, as producer, engineer and on acoustic guitar)
Rainbow – Long Live Rock ‘n’ Roll (1978, as producer/engineer)
Iron Maiden – Run To The Hills (1982, as producer/engineer)

Salome Bey, 80, Canadian jazz singer, on Aug. 9
Salome Bey – Hit The Nail Right On The Head (1970)
Salome Bey – Lover Man (1992)

Don Martin, bassist of New Zealand new wave band Mi-Sex, on Aug. 10

Waldemar Bastos, 66, Angolan musician, on Aug. 10
Waldemar Bastos – Teresa Ana (1983)
Waldemar Bastos – Sofrimento (1998)

Trini Lopez, 83, singer and actor, on Aug. 11
The Big Beats – Clark’s Expedition (1957, as member on guitar)
Trini Lopez – A-me-ri-ca (1963)
Trini Lopez – Lemon Tree (1964)

Pat Fairley, 76, bassist of Scottish pop band Marmalade, on Aug. 11
Marmalade – Baby Make It Soon (1969)

Belle du Berry, 54, singer of French group Paris Combo, on Aug. 11
Paris Combo – Moi, mon âme, ma conscience (1997)

Carlos Burity, 67, Angolan semba musician, on Aug. 12

Steve Grossman, 69, jazz saxophonist, on Aug. 13
Steve Grossman – Zulu Stomp (1974)

Ewa Demarczyk, 79, Polish singer and poet, on Aug. 14

Pete Way, 69, bass guitarist with rock band UFO, on Aug. 14
UFO – Young Blood (1980, also as co-writer)

Valentina Legkostupova, 54, Russian pop singer, on Aug. 14

Ron Heathman, guitarist with rock band Supersuckers, on Aug. 18
The Supersuckers – Rock-n-Roll Records (Ain’t Selling This Year) (2003)

Jack Sherman, 64, guitarist with the Red Hot Chili Peppers (1983-84), on Aug. 18
Red Hot Chilli Peppers – True Men Don’t Kill Coyotes (1984, also as co-writer)

Sean Pentecost, drummer of Australian metal band Superheist, on Aug.18.

Roger Quigley, 51, singer-songwriter with indie duo Montgolfier Brothers, on Aug. 18
The Montgolfier Brothers – Between Two Points (1999)

Steve Gulley, 57, bluegrass singer-songwriter, on Aug. 18

Cathy Smith, 73, Canadian-born backup singer, on Aug. 18
Hoyt Axton – Evangelina (1976)

Hal ‘Cornbread’ Singer, 100, jazz tenor saxophonist, on Aug 18
Wynonie Harris – Good Rockin’ Tonight (1947, on tenor sax)
Hal Singer Orchestra – Easy Living (1953)
Hal Singer – Cloud Nine (1964)

Lou Ragland, 78, soul singer and producer, on Aug. 19
Lou Ragland – Understand Each Other (1978)

Todd Nance, 57, drummer of rock band Widespread Panic, on Aug. 19

Justin Townes Earle, 38, singer-songwriter, on Aug. 20
Justin Townes Earle – Harlem River Blues (2010)
Justin Townes Earle – Am I That Lonely Tonight (2012)
Justin Townes Earle – Burning Pictures (2014)
Justin Townes Earle – The Saint Of Lost Causes (2019)

Piotr Szczepanik, 78, Polish singer and actor, on Aug. 20

Frankie Banali, 68, drummer of Quiet Riot, WASP, on Aug. 20
Quiet Riot – Metal Health (Bang Your Head) (1983, also as co-writer)
W.A.S.P. – Mean Man (1983)

Ron Tudor, 96, Australian producer and label owner (Fable Records), on Aug. 21

Bryan Lee, 77, blues musician, on Aug. 21
Bryan Lee – I’ll Play The Blues For You (1993)

Steve Sample Sr., 90, jazz bandleader, arranger and educator, on Aug. 22

J. Rogers, 72, soul singer and producer, on Aug. 22
D.J. Rogers – Listen To The Message (1973)
D.J. Rogers – Say You Love Me (1975)

Ulla Pia, 75, Danish singer, on Aug. 22

Walter Lure, 71, guitarist with The Heartbreakers, on Aug. 22
Johnny Thunders and The Heartbreakers – To Much Junkie Business (1992, also as writer)

Giannis Poulopoulos, 79, Greek singer-songwriter, on Aug. 23

Charlie Persip, 91, jazz drummer, on Aug. 23
Dizzy Gillespie Sextet – Devil And The Fish (1954, on drums)
Dinah Washington – Someone’s Rocking My Dreamboat (1957)

Peter King, 80, English jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, composer, on Aug. 23
Everything But The Girl – The Night I Heard Caruso Sing (1988, on saxophone)

Riley Gale, 34, singer of metal band Power Trip, on Aug. 24

Itaru Oki, 78, Japanese jazz trumpeter and flugelhornist, on Aug. 25

Mick Hart, Australian folk-rock musician, on Aug. 25
Mick Hart – Watching It Fade (2001)

Gerry McGhee, 58, singer of Canadian rock band Brighton Rock, on Aug. 25

Chet Himes, 73, recording engineer, reported on Aug. 26
Christopher Cross – Ride Like The Wind (1979, as engineer)

Mike Noga, 43, Australian rock multi-instrumentalist, on Aug. 27
The Drones – The Minotaur (2008, as member on drums)

Ronnie Kole, 89, jazz pianist, New Orleans French Quarter Festival founder, on Aug. 27

Mark Colby, 71, jazz fusion saxophonist, on Aug. 31
Mark Colby – On And On (1979)

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In Memoriam – July 2020

August 4th, 2020 5 comments

The month started off quite brutally, with July 6 being particularly harsh. Things eased as the month neared its end. I’m still noting where people died of complications from Covid-19, since there are still idiots who think that protecting others from catching this virus is unimportant or incompatible with their screwed ideologies. Not masking up kills people. Be decent. Wear those masks.

The Maestro
You know a musician’s lifework is universally beloved when it is hailed by music fans of every genre, a top football club and the Vatican. The AS Roma football team got it right when it wore on its sleeves the legend “Grazie, Maestro” below the outline of the face of film composer Ennio Morricone by way of tribute. Readers of this blog needn’t be instructed about the genius of Morricone, nor be subjected to a tortured list of my favourite pieces of Morricone compositions — such a list would never end. But should there be anybody left who is uncertain what the Morricone fuss is all about, let me refer them to the exquisite soundtrack of Once Upon A Time In America, a masterpiece which guides you through an emotional journey (one of the featured tacks is from that soundtrack).

The Big Mac
Readers of this corner of the Internet also needn’t be reminded that before Fleetwood Mac were coked-up million-sellers in sunny California, they were a blues-rock band in grimy England (possibly experimenting with a variety of drugs, but more of that in a bit). The first incarnation had at its centre guitarist and songwriter Peter Green, whose blues guitar chops moved BB King to issue highest praise. For Fleetwood Mac, Green wrote Black Magic Woman (later a hit for another gifted guitarist, featured on Any Major Originals – The Classics), the instrumental mega-hit Albatross, Oh Well, The Green Manalishi, and others.

Green wasn’t into the stardom or the money that came with it. His experimentations with LSD also had an effect on his mental state. He was eventually diagnosed with schizophrenia. Green left Fleetwood Mac in 1971. He continued to record here and there, but faded into obscurity (though his 1979 album In The Skies was very good). In 1979 his old pals from Fleetwood Mac included Green, uncredited, on the song Brown Eyes from Tusk.

The Devil’s Competitor
Will there be a rematch for a fiddle after the death of Charlie Daniels? The country-rocker became a sorry example of the hateful culture-warrior that brought the world the Disaster Express that is Donald Trump. But in his younger day, Daniels was a member of the counterculture and a supporter of Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. Let us remember that Charlie Daniels objected to the KKK’s use of his poorly-titled Southern Rock anthem The South’s Gonna Do It Again.

Before he broke through as a headliner, Daniels was a session musician, playing for the likes of Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Al Kooper, Flatts & Scruggs, Ringo Starr and, especially, the Marshall Tucker Band.

The Jazz Singer
With the death of Annie Ross, all three of the pioneering jazz vocalese trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross are gone, with Dave Lambert having died already in 1966, and Jon Hendricks in 2017. Ross left the trio in 1962, succeeded by Yolande Bavan, the sole survivor of either line-up. Born in London as Annabelle Short, Ross came to the US as a child. In 1943 she played Judy Garland’s sister in Presenting Lily Mars. A year later she won a songwriting contest, with Johnny Mercer recording her song, Let’s Fly. She joined Lambert and Hendricks in 1957, having earlier worked alongside Lambert. Initially they wanted to record with different female singers, but Ross so impressed them that she was invited to join the group.

While with the trio, she also recorded solo albums, and in 1962 left the group. She went on to found a high-class jazz club in London, and had a good career as a film actress.

The Synth Pioneer
Remember that strange keyboard solo on Del Shannon’s Runaway (a song with so many delightful touches)? That was played on a musitron by its inventor, Max Crook. The musitron was an early type of monophonic synthethiser which, according to Wikipedia, was “a clavioline heavily enhanced with additional resistors, television tubes, and parts from household appliances, old amplifiers, and reel-to-reel tape machines”. It influenced the likes of Berry Gordy, Joe Meek, Ennio Morricone, John Barry and Roy Wood.

Crook was operating his invention on stage as a member of Del Shannon’s backing group when he played a chord-change from A-minor to G. The singer and the keyboardist used that as the basis for Runaway, which turned out to be a million-seller.

The Toto Father
I imagine growing up in the Porcaro household must have been a blast, at least from a music point of view. Joe Porcaro, who has died at 90, was a session drummer and percussionist in the Wrecking Crew, and all three of his sons — Jeff, Steve and Mike (two of whom Joe outlived) — became sought-after session musicians themselves, and founders of the group Toto. Porcaro Sr did percussion work on all Toto albums in their heyday (including percussions and marimabas on their 1982 mega-hit Africa). Joe Porcaro also made it a point to teach budding musicians: he was a co-founder of the Los Angeles College of Music.

Porcaro also played on the scores of films such as Kelly’s Heroes, Enter The Dragon, The Color Purple, E.T., Romancing The Stone, The Right Stuff, Alien Resurrection, Independence Day, Taps, The Abyss, Empire Of The Sun, Die Hard, Joe Versus The Volcano, The Naked Gun, Edward Scissorhands, Dances With Wolves, and many more.

The Soul Singer
The news came too late for inclusion in last month’s In Memoriam, so we pay tribute to Tami Lynn here. The New Orleans soul singer didn’t have the long career her talent deserved. Her only hit, I’m Gonna Run Away From You, came in the UK six years after she first recorded it. Lynn did frequent backing vocals for Dr John as well as for The Rolling Stones.

The Glee Singer
Naya Rivera is the third main cast member of the TV series Glee to die young (a subject she sang about in Season 5 of the show). Preceding her tragic death in a drowning were those of Cory Monleith (of suicide) and Mark Salling (also of suicide, after being convicted of possessing child porn). Even before Rivera’s apparent death, there was talk of the “Curse of Glee”. Rivera died heroically, saving her four-year-old son from drowning in a lake, but not able to save herself. It seems a cruel irony that at the time of her death, Rivera was a star on a TV series titled Step Up: High Water.

The text above and the list below is included as a PDF file.

Tami Lynn, 77, soul singer, on June 26
Tami Lynn – I’m Gonna Run Away From You (1965)
Dr John – Gris-Gris Gumbo Ya Ya (1968, on backing vocals)
Tami Lynn – Wings Upon Your Horn (1972)
The Rolling Stones – Let It Loose (1972, on backing vocals)

Max Crook, 83, American keyboardist and songwriter, on July 1
Del Shannon – Runaway (1961, as co-writer and on musitron)
Maximilian – The Snake (1961, as Maximilian)
Brian Hyland (1970, on keyboards)

Marvin Brown, 66, falsetto singer of soul group The Softones, on July 3
The Softones – Maybe Tomorrow (1977, on lead vocals)

Sebastián Athié, 24, Mexican actor and musician, on July 4

Silvano Silvi, 83, singer of Italian pop group Gli Erranti, on July 4
Silvano Silvi e gli Erranti – Tenendoti per mano (1963)

Cleveland Eaton, 80, jazz bassist, producer, composer, publisher, on July 5
Ramsey Lewis Trio – Wade In The Water (1966, on bass)
Cleveland Eaton – Bama Boogie Woogie (1978)

Tiloun, 53, Réunionese singer, on July 5
Tiloun – Regninay

Ennio Morricone, 91, Italian film composer, on July 6
Ennio Morricone – The Man With The Harmonica (1968)
Ennio Morricone – My Name Is Nobody (1973)
Ennio Morricone – Childhood Memories (1984)
Ennio Morricone – Cinema Paradiso (1988)

Joe Porcaro, 90, session drummer and percussionist, on July 6
Nancy Sinatra – Sugar Town (1966, on percussions)
Boz Scaggs – Lido Shuffle (on drums)
Cheryl Lynn – You’re The One (1978, on percussions)
Toto – Pamela (1988, on percussion)

Charlie Daniels, 83, country singer-songwriter and musician, on July 6
Bob Dylan – Lay Lady Lay (1969, on electric guitar)
Charlie Daniels Band – Long Haired Country Boy (1975)
Charlie Daniels Band – High Lonesome (1976)
Charlie Daniels Band – Drinkin’ My Baby Goodbye (1985)

Lane Tietgen, 74, musician and songwriter, on July 7
The Serfs – Evil Days (1969, on guitar and bass, as writer)

Naya Rivera, 33, actress (Glee), singer and author, drowned on July 8
Naya Rivera – Valerie (2010)
Naya Rivera – If I Die Young (2014)

Patricia Majalisa, 53, South African singer, on July 9

Eddie Gale, 78, jazz trumpeter, on July 10
Eddie Gale – The Rain (1968)
Sun Ra and His Arkestra – Flamingo (1979, on trumpet)

Gordon Stone, 70, bluegrass musician, on July 10
Gordon Stone – Alabama Banjo Dream (1981)

Phil Ashley, 65, session keyboardist, on July 10
Debbie Harry – French Kissin’ In The USA (1986, on keyboards)

Cosmas Magaya, 67, Zimbabwean mbira musician, of Covid-19 on July 10

Rich Priske, 52, Canadian bassist, on July 11
Matthew Good Band – Strange Days (2000, as member)

Lil Marlo, 30, rapper, shot dead on July 11

Benjamin Keough, 27, backup singer and Elvis Presley’s grandson, suicide on July 12

Rod Bernard, 79, swamp pop singer, on July 12
Rod Bernard – This Should Go On Forever (1959)

Jarno Sarkula, 47, member if Finnish avant garde group Alamaailman Vasarat, on July 12

Judy Dyble, 71, English folk singer-songwriter, on July 12
Fairport Convention – I Don’t Know Where I Stand (1968, as member on lead vocals)
The Conspirators with Judy Dyble – One Sure Thing (2008)

Raúl Pagano, Argentinian rock keyboard player, on July 14

J. Lionel, 72, Belgian singer, on July 14

Rudy Palacios, 74 member of Tejano group Sunny & the Sunliners, of Covid-19 on July 14

Jimmy Walker, drummer of 1960s pop group The Knickerbockers, on July 15
The Knickerbockers – Lies (1965)

Jamie Oldaker, 68, session drummer and percussionist (Eric Clapton), on July 16
Eric Clapton – Lay Down Sally (1978, on drums and percussions)

Víctor Víctor, 71, Dominican singer-songwriter, Covid-19 on July 16

Ken Chinn, 57, singer of Canadian punk band SNFU, on July 16
SNFU – She’s Not On The Menu (1986)

Emitt Rhodes, 70, singer-songwriter and musician, on July 19
The Merry-Go-Round – Live (1967, as writer and on lead vocals)

Dobby Dobson, 78, Jamaican reggae singer, producer, of Covid-19 on July 21
Dobby Dobson – Loving Pauper (1970)

Annie Ross, 89, singer jazz trio Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, songwriter, and actress, on July 21
Charlie Parker And His Orchestra – In The Still Of The Night (1957, on vocals)
Lambert, Hendricks & Ross – Twisted (1959, also as co-writer)
Annie Ross with the Gerry Mulligan Quartet – All Of You (1959)

Tim Smith, 59, English rock singer-songwriter, musician, producer, on July 22
Cardiacs – Is This The Life? (1988, as singer and writer)

Dominic Sonic, 55, French rock singer, on July 23
Dominic Sonic – When My Tears Run Cold (1989)

Regis Philbin, 88, TV personality and entertainer, on July 24
Regis Philbin – You Make Me Feel So Young (2004)

CP Lee, 70, English musician, on July 25
Alberto y Lost Trios Paranoias – Gobbing On Life (1977)

Peter Green, 73, English blues rock singer-songwriter and guitarist, on July 25
Fleetwood Mac – The Green Manalishi (1970)
Peter Green – A Fool No More (1979)
Fleetwood Mac – Brown Eyes (1979, uncredited on guitar)

Miss Mercy, 71, singer with Zappa project The GTO’s, on July 27
The GTO’s – Circular Circulation (1969)

Denise Johnson, 56, singer with Scottish rock group Primal Scream, on July 27
Primal Scream – Don’t Fight It, Feel It (1991, on lead vocals)

Richard Wallace, 80, singer and guitarist with The Mighty Clouds of Joy, on July 27
The Mighty Clouds Of Joy – Stoned World (1974)
The Mighty Clouds Of Joy – In These Changing Time (1979)

Bent Fabric, 95, Danish jazz pianist and composer, on July 28
Bent Fabric – The Alleycat (1962, also a writer)

Renato Barros, 76, Brazilian singer and guitarist, on July 28
Renato e seus Blue Caps – Darling (1971, as frontman)

Malik B., 47, rapper with The Roots, on July 29
The Roots – Section (1996, on rap)

Balla Sidibé, 78, bandleader of Senegal’s Orchestra Baobab, on July 29
Orchestra Baobab – Balla Daffe (2001, also as writer)

Juan Ramón, 80, Argentine singer and actor, on July 30

Bill Mack, 88, country singer, songwriter and radio DJ, of Covid-19 on July 31
Bill Mack – Drinking Champagne (1966, also as writer)
LeAnn Rimes – Blue (1996, as writer)

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In Memoriam – June 2020

July 2nd, 2020 7 comments

At last, there was a month of some respite, at least in comparison to the past few months of carnage (though the last week was pretty brutal). Still, we lost as few legends in their field, and one singer’s assassination sparked off social unrest.

The Pointer Sister
When on 9 June I posted the Protest Soul Vol. 3 mix, featuring the Pointer Sisters song Yes We Can Can, I didn’t know that Bonnie Pointer had died the day before. Bonnie started the band with younger sister June in 1969, with Anita and then Ruth joining later. In the earlier days, the Pointer Sisters were eclectic, adopting an image based on the Andrews Sisters, and performing material that ranged from soul to funk to jazz to country. Their 1974 crossover hit Fairytale, which Bonnie co-wrote with Anita, was full-on country.

Bonnie left the group in the late 1970s to pursue a solo career, but that yielded only one hit, 1979’s disco version of The Elgins’ Heaven Must Have Sent You, which peaked at #11. After Bonnie left, the sisters carried on as a trio.

The Glam Bassist
Glam rock introduced the British public (and people beyond) to male pop stars wearing make-up, but even then, few really camped it up as heterosexually as Steve Priest, bassist of The Sweet. His interjection on the 1973 hit Block Buster “They just haven’t got a clue what to do” is the stuff of legend. So when The Sweet went square and released 1978’s Level Headed LP, it was disappointing to see Steve looking, well, like a school teacher who’ll have to take action against hell-raisers on a teenage rampage. With Priest’s death, Andy Scott is the final survivor of the classic Sweet line-up.

The Guitar Man
The Any Major Guitar Vol. 2 mix featured songs with guitar parts I particularly like. Among them was the solo on Rod Stewart’s Sailing by Pete Carr. I noted that another one of his solos, on Bob Seger’s Against The Wind might have featured instead. Carr was still a teenager when he recorded, as a bassist, an album with Duane and Gregg Allman in the band Hour Glass. That led to him to the FAME studios, where soon he became lead guitarist for the in-house band, the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. At FAME he played on most hits produced there in the 1970s, and also worked behind the scenes in production and engineering. In between, he formed a duo with Lenny LeBlanc, and had a hit with their song Falling.

Carr’s guitar can be heard on hits such as Rod Stewart’s Tonight’s The Night, Luther Ingram’s If Loving You is Wrong, Barbra Streisand’s Woman In Love (that intro!), Paul Simon’s Kodachrome and Take Me To The Mardi Gras, Mary McGregor’s Torn Between Two Lovers, Bob Seger’s Main Street, Still The Same, Hollywood Nights and practically everything else Seger did between 1972 and 1986. And, having recorded with both Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, Carr was in the backing band in their Concert In The Park reunion.

The War Singer
A few weeks ago I reposted a mix of German hits from the WW2 years, among which were subtly-spun propaganda songs exhorting the German population to keep courage while their cities were bombed and sons and husbands fell in the field. In Britain, Vera Lynn filled a similar function by singing about meeting again at an unknowable time in the future (in the 1940s hit version, backed by a choir of servicemen), how there’ll always be an England, and about how the white cliffs of Dover would greet returning soldiers.

With these songs that gave comfort and the spirit of endurance, Lynn’s name in the book of British music legends was still shone bright for the remaining 75+ years of her life. Her big hits were used a lot for jingoistic propaganda to agitate for Brexit, but if We’ll Meet Again isn’t remembered as war-time classic, it might be as the song that scores the final scene of Dr Strangelove, as the world fades away in an atomic armageddon.

The Theme Composer
The man who write the theme of M*A*S*H has died, apparently of natural causes, at 94. Johnny Mandel put the music to the lyrics by director Robert Altman’s 14-year-old son Michael, who was roped in to write the most intentionally idiotic lyrics to fit the title Suicide Is Painless. Against Mandel’s wishes, it became the movie’s theme song. As an instrumental theme for the TV series, the tune became one of the most recognisable of the 1970s.

He won Grammy awards for his songs Emily (from the 1964 comedy film The Americanization of Emily) and the much-covered The Shadow of Your Smile (from The Sandpiper), which also won the Oscar for Best Song in 1966. Films whose scores he composed included Caddyshack, Being There, The Verdict, Freaky Friday (1976 version), Agatha, Escape to Witch Mountain, Point Blank, Pretty Poison, I Want To Live! and The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming (which starred Carl Reiner, who died on the same day as Mandel).

Mandel was not only a prolific songwriter and score composer for film and TV, but was also a sought-after arranger for the likes of Hoagy Carmichael, Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Mel Tormé, Anita O’Day, Buddy Rich, Quincy Jones, Peggy Lee, Diane Schuur, Diane Krall, Barbra Streisand, Lee Ritenour, James Ingram, Natalie Cole, Michael Jackson (on Will You Be There) and Steely Dan (he arranged the strings on FM).

The Reggae Pioneer
Jamaican guitarist Hux Brown played on pioneering reggae songs such as Bangarang by Lester Sterling, Rivers of Babylon by The Melodians, The Harder They Come by Jimmy Cliff Girl, I’ve Got A Date by Alton Ellis, Ba Ba Boom by the Jamaicans; and many tracks by Lee “Scratch” Perry, Bob Marley & The Wailing Wailers, and Toots And The Maytalls, whom he joined in the 1970s and stayed with for 35 years. Outside reggae, he backed Paul Simon (on Mother And Child Reunion) and Herbie Mann.

The Singing Producer
As a young folk musician in England, Rupert Hine was pals with a pre-fame Paul Simon (rough month for Paul, with three former collaborators dying this month). In the 1970s he had a Top 10 UK hit with his band Quantum Jump and recorded prolifically as a solo artist, without bothering the charts (though he sang on the Better Off Dead soundtrack in 1985).

It was as a producer Hine left a mark with acts like Yvonne Elliman, Kevin Ayers, After The Fire, Murray Head, Camel, The Members, Tina Turner (Better Be Good To Me; Break Every Rule), The Fixx, Chris De Burgh (Don’t Pay The Ferryman; High On Emotion), Jona Lewie, Howard Jones (What Is Love; Like To Get To Know You Well; Hide And Seek, Things Can Only Get Better, Life In One Day), The Waterboys (A Girl Called Johnny), Thompson Twins (The Long Goodbye; Get That Love), Bob Geldof, Rush, Stevie Nicks (Rooms On Fire), Duncan Sheik, Suzanne Vega and others.

The Last Left Banker
The Left Banke is now empty, after the death of the last surviving member of the classic line-up, bass player Tom Finn. Just over five years ago, they were all still alive. Since then, keyboardist and chief songwriter Michael Brown died in 2015; drummer George Cameron in 2018, and guitarist Steve Martin Caro in January this year.  After the band split, Finn went on to engineer at Bell Records, and then became a DJ, at the prompting of Studio 54 owner Steve Rubell. Among Finn’s clients were Bill and Hilary Clinton.

The Assassins’ Victim
It seems to become a common event that musicians are killed or otherwise persecuted for advocating social justice. In the past few months we’ve seen the death of gospel singer Kizitio Mihigo  while in police custody in Rwanda in February, and the hunger strikes deaths of Ibrahim Gökçek and Helin Bölek in Erdogan’s Turkey in April and May. On June 29, assassins’ bullets killed Ethiopian singer-songwriter Hachalu Hundessa, who was an activist for political and social reform and the rights of the Oromo ethnic group, which has been discriminated against by successive Ethiopian regimes, starting with that of Haile Selassie.

Hundessa’s murder sparked off civil unrest, with at least 11 protesters shot dead. The day after his murder, the Ethiopian government shut down the internet in much of the country.

 

As last month, this post is included as a PDF booklet for easy future reference, replacing the old *.txt files. It takes a bit of effort to create. Let me know in the comments if I should continue with it.

Joey Image, 63, drummer of punk rock band Misfits, on June 1
Misfits – Horror Business (1978)

Majek Fashek, 57, Nigerian reggae singer and songwriter, on June 1
Majek Fashek – Send Down The Rain (1988)

Chris Trousdale, 34, singer with boy band Dream Street, of Covid-129 on June 2

Werner ‘Gottlieb Wendehals’ Böhm, 78, German singer and musician, on June 3

Dulce Nunes, 90, Brazilian singer, composer, producer & actress, of Covid-19 on June 4
Dulce Nunes – Pobre Menina Rica (1964)

Steve Priest, 72, bassist and later singer of The Sweet, on June 4
Sweet – Wig-Wam Bam (1972)
Sweet – Block Buster (1973)
Sweet – The Six Teens (1974)
Sweet – Love Is Like Oxygen (1978)

Rupert Hine, 72, English musician, songwriter and producer, on June 5
Quantum Jump – The Lone Ranger (1976, as member on vocals and keyboard)
Howard Jones – Hide And Seek (!984, as producer)
Rupert Hine – Arrested By You (1985, also as co-writer)

Frank Bey, 74, blues singer, on June 7
Frank Bey – Idle Hands (2020)

Floyd Lee, 86, New York blues busker and musician, on June 7
Floyd Lee Band – Mean Blues (2001)

Jesse Sanders, 76, member of surf-rock band The Tornadoes, on June 7
The Tornadoes – Bustin’ Surfboards (1962)

James ‘Slim’ Hand, 67, country singer-songwriter, on June 8
James Hand – In The Corner, At The Table, By The Jukebox (2006)

Bonnie Pointer, 69, singer with The Pointer Sisters, on June 8
The Pointer Sisters – Fairytale (1974, also as co-writer)
The Pointer Sisters – Easy Days (1975, on lead vocals & as co-writer)
Bonnie Pointer – Heaven Must Have Sent You (1979)

Uta Pilling, 71, German musician, songwriter and illustrator, on June 8

Pau Donés, 53, singer-songwriter, guitarist with Spanish rock group Jarabe de Palo, on June 9
Jarabe de Palo – Agua (1998)

Paul Chapman, 66, Welsh guitarist (UFO, Lone Star), on June 9
UFO – This Fire Burns Tonight (1980, on lead guitar & as co-writer)

Ricky Valance, 84, Welsh pop singer, on June 12
Ricky Valance – Tell Laura I Love Her (1960)

Claude Ndam, 65, Cameroonian singer-songwriter, on June 12

Dodo Doris, 71, drummer of Congolese/Kenyan Orchestra Super Mazembe, on June 12
Super Mazembe Orchestra – Shauri Yako (1983)

Marc Zermati, 75, French producer and promoter, on June 13
The Flamin’ Groovies – River Deep Mountain High (1981, as co-producer)

Keith Tippett, 72, British jazz-rock pianist, on June 14
Keith Tippett Group – Black Horse (1971)

Omondi Long’lilo, 37, Kenyan Benga musician, on June 15

Nana Tuffour, 66, Ghanaian highlife singer, on June 15
Nana Tuffour – Abeiku (2002)

Yohan, 28, singer with South Korean K-pop boyband TST, on June 16

Yuji ‘You’ Adachi, 56, guitarist, songwriter of Japanese hard rock band Dead End, on June 16
Dead End – So Sweet So Lonely (1989)

Hugh Fraser, 62, Canadian jazz pianist, trombonist and composer, on June 17

Vera Lynn, 103, British singer, on June 18
Vera Lynn – We’ll Meet Again (1939, original version)
Vera Lynn – Be Like The Kettle And Sing (1944)
Vera Lynn – When You Hear Big Ben, You’re Home Again (1954)

Hux Brown, 75, Jamaican guitarist with The Maytals, on June 18
Bob Marley & The Wailing Wailers – Rocksteady (1969, on guitar)
Paul Simon – Mother And Child Reunion (1972, on guitar)
The Maytals – Give Us A Piece Of The Action (1977, on guitar as member)

Ellington ‘Fugi’ Jordan, 80, soul & blues singer, songwriter and producer, on June 18
Fugi ‎- Mary Don’t Take Me On No Bad Trip (1968, also as writer and co-producer)
Clarence Carter – I’d Rather Go Blind (1969, as writer)

Aaron Tokona, 45, New Zealand guitarist and singer, on June 20

Joan Pau Verdier, 73, French chanson singer, on June 21
Joan Pau Verdier – Vivre (1976)

Ian Stoddart, drummer and bassist of pop band Win, announced on June 22
Win – You’ve Got The Power (1985)

Margarita Pracatan, 89, Cuban novelty singer, on June 23

Claude Le Péron, 72, French bass guitarist, on June 24

Jacques Coursil, 82, French jazz trumpeter and composer, on June 25

Graeme Williamson, singer of Canadian new wave band Pukka Orchestra, on June 25
Pukka Orchestra – Cherry Beach Express (1984)

Huey, 31, rapper, shot on June 25

Charles Lawton Jiles, 90, country musician and songwriter, on June 26
Porter Wagoner – My Baby’s Not Here (In Town Tonight) (1963, as co-writer)

Sandra Feva, 73, soul singer, on June 26
Sandra Feva – Choking Kind (1979)
Sandra Feva – Leaving This Time (1981)

Mats Rådberg, 72, Swedish country singer, on June 27

Freddy Cole, 88, jazz singer and pianist, brother of Nat ‘King’ Cole, on June 27
Freddy Cole – Black Coffee (1964)
Freddy Cole – This Time I’m Gone For Good (2014)

Tom Finn, 71, bassist of pop band The Left Banke, on June 27
The Left Banke – I’ve Got Something On My Mind (1967)
The Left Banke – Nice To See You (1969, also as writer)

Pete Carr, 70, Muscle Shoals guitarist, on June 27
Hour Glass – Power Of Love (1968, as member on bass)
Sandra Wright – I’ll See You Through (I’ll Be Your Shelter) (1974, on guitar)
LeBlanc & Carr – Falling (1977)
Bob Seger – Against The Wind (1980, on lead guitar)

Simon H. Fell, 61, British free jazz bassist, on June 28

Benny Mardones, 73, soft-rock singer, on June 29
Benny Mardones – Into The Night (1989, also as writer)

Willie Wright, 80, soul singer, on June 29
Willie Wright – I’m So Happy Now (1977)

Stepa J. Groggs, 32, rapper (original member of Injury Reserve), on June 29

Johnny Mandel, 94, film composer, arranger, on June 29
Frank Sinatra – Ring-A-Ding-Ding (1960, as arranger and conductor)
Tony Bennett – The Shadow of Your Smile (1966, as co-writer and arranger)
The Mash – Suicide Is Painless (1980, as co-writer and arranger)
Quincy Jones – Velas (1980, as arranger)

Hachalu Hundessa, 34, Ethiopian singer and songwriter, assassinated on June 29
Hachalu Hundessa – Maalan Jira (2016)

Walter Nita, 69, Dutch singer, on June 30

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In Memoriam – May 2020

June 4th, 2020 2 comments

Another relentless month, and not just because Covid-19 (though that virus was a factor in several deaths). May claimed a number of innovators and trailblazers — Little Richard, Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider, Betty Wright, Mory Kanyté. But the deaths we should mourn more than others is that of Turkish musicians Ibrahim Gökçek and Helion Bölek, who have died of hunger strike in protest against the persecution of their group by Turkey’s Erdoğan regime.

The Superstar
Little needs to be added to the many tributes for Little Richard, other than to note that without him, we’d not have had The Beatles as we knew them. I can only imagine how explosive the sounds of Little Richard, and Elvis’ Hound Dog, must have sounded to teenagers in the 1950s. In a tweet, British music journalist Simon Price summed up most fittingly Little Richard’s position in the history of rock ‘n’ roll: “Little Richard was the firecracker who set it all off. Right there at rock ‘n’ roll’s Big Bang, this ungovernable force transcending race, gender and sexuality. Literally a screaming queen. I met him once and it was like touching the hand of God. We owe him everything. RIP (it up).”

The Beatles certainly owed him a lot. When the young Liverpool quartet was supporting Mr Perriman on his England tour in 1963, Little Richard taught Paul McCartney to scream — s skill Macca put to good use in tracks such as I Saw Her Standing There and I’m Down to Helter Skelter and Hey Jude. And, of course, The Beatles borrowed their “wooo” from Littler Richard.

And, of course, check out Little Richard singing Rubber Ducky on Sesame Street.

The Robot Pioneer
It seems entirely in keeping with Florian Schneider’s ways that his death on April 21 would remain unreported for more than two weeks. With his band Kraftwerk, human emotion was unimportant, to the extent that in 1978 the members were replaced by identikit robots whom one could barely tell apart from the living men. In person, Schneider was said to be warm and funny. It is good that his death was met with many warm tributes.

Kraftwerk (properly prtonounced CRUFT-vairk) weren’t the only pioneers of electronic music — the German scene had several of those — but they had the greatest impact on the international mainstream pop that was to follow, be it Eurodisco, the post-punk synth pop in the UK, dance and electronica, or the Neue Deutsche Welle in Germany. And that influence manifested itself not only in music but also in image. David Bowie was an early adopter: the instrumental on his Heroes album (and b-side of the single of the title track) is named V2-Schneider in tribute to Florian — even if the war reference in the title sounded a bit insulting.

The Soul Allrounder
For a generation of strong, independently-minded and put-upon women, Betty Wright articulated the right responses to often inferior men — and the right to be satisfied. A songwriter and an accomplished singer — she could hit notes every bit as high as later pretenders such as Mariah Carey — Wright also had a strong stage presence. Witness her command of the audience on Tonight Is The Night.

She won a Grammy for Best R&B Song for Where Is The Love?, then discovered disco-funkster Peter Brown, with whom she duetted on the 1978 dance classic  Dance With Me. In 1988, Wright became the first black female artist to score a gold album on her own label, with her album Mother.  Later she went into vocals arranging and producing for acts like Gloria Estefan, Tom Jones, Jennifer Lopez and Joss Stone. And she also sang backing vocals on Stevie Wonder’s hit Happy Birthday and All I Do, which featured earlier this month on Any Major Soul 1980.

The Beatles’ Friend
It’s rare that non-musicians feature in this series, but the death of Astrid Kirchherr a week before her 82nd birthday needs to be noted. Kirchherr was a young photographer when she met the yet unknown and even younger five Beatles in Hamburg in 1961. Of the Fab Five, one absconded to be with her — Stuart Sutcliffe died a year later (and Pete Best was later replaced). At her intervention, the group changed their Teddy Boy hairstyles to the moptops they became famous with. Kirchherr would reject the idea that she had “invented” these hairstyles, saying that lots of German boys had been wearing them. Still, if any hairstyle ever had any pivotal role in changing pop music, it was the one Astrid Kirchherr prescribed The Beatles.

The Prog Punk
Even people who have no truck with the grimy pub-rock of The Stranglers might have grooved to the sounds of the band’s keyboardist Dave Greenfield: his keyboard sounds dominate Waltz In Black, the theme of TV cook Keith Floyd’s alcohol-drenched programmes. Greenfield’s prog-rock keyboards transformed the pub-rock of The Stranglers (they never really were punk). Consider their hit No More Heroes: without the swirling keyboards, it’s a sneering rock song with a guitar solo. And hear what Greenfield does with The Strangler’s version of Walk On By, a truly unattractive cover until he goes all Isaac Hayes on it, turning it into an impressive work.

Greenfield was often compared to The Doors’ Ray Manzarek, whose work similarly transformed the sound of his band. Greenfield claimed that he had never heard of Manzarek before The Stranglers. He cited as his decidedly non-punk influences Rick Wakeman of Yes.

Miles’ Drummer
For nearly three decades, jazz drummer Jimmy Cobb was the last man standing of the Miles Davis Sextet which recorded the seminal Kind Of Blue album. Davis died in 1991, John Coltrane in 1967, Paul Chambers in 1969, Wynton Kelly (who played piano on Freddie Freeloader) in 1971, Cannonball Adderley in 1975, Bill Evans in 1980. Cobb played on many Miles Davis albums, including on the marvellous Sketches Of Spain and Miles Davis at Carnegie Hall. A drummer known for his subtlety and restraint, Cobb backed many jazz greats, including Dinah Washington, Sarah Vaughan, both Adderley Bothers, Wayne Shorter, Wes Montgomery, John Coltrane, Joe Henderson, Dorothy Ashby, Hubert Laws and many others.

The One-hit Pioneer
For a one-hit wonder, Millie Small’s brief residence in the limelight with her hit My Boy Lollipop was significant. She was the first Jamaican to have a worldwide hit with a song made in Jamaica, and the first to have an international smash with a song in the bluebeat genre, which fused R&B, pop and ska, and is regarded an ancestor of reggae. Alas, Millie said she never received royalties from her mega-hit, and eventually slid into poverty. She received honours later in life; and apparently Island Records founder Chris Blackwell gave her some financial sustenance to keep her going.

The Griot Man
With his song Yé ké Yé ké, Guinean singer Mory Kanté scored the first million-seller by an African Read more…

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In Memoriam – April 2020

May 5th, 2020 9 comments

What a horrible month! Even without Covid-19, April would have been a cruel month. I count 16 coronavirus-related music deaths this month (excluding classical and national folk music musicians). Disclaimer: in many cases, as I understand it, Covid-19 is not the only or primary cause of death. Where it states that somebody died of Covid-19, it does not exclude associated causes of death.

The Soul Legend
The news of Bill Withers’ death took a while to be announced. He died on March 30, but his death was made publicly known only on April 3. I paid tribute to the great singer with a mix of cover versions of his songs. A couple of days later I caught up on Netflix on an excellent documentary about the backroom fixer Clarence Avant. Featured in the film was Bill Withers, who had been discovered by Avant when the singer was still an airplane mechanic.

The Singing Mailman
A few days after Withers died, another giant fell in John Prine, whose death I also marked with a tribute and mix of covers of his songs. Like Withers, Prine was a working man when he was discovered. The mailman in Chicago became something of an overnight sensation in 1971 with his astonishing self-titled debut album. It was the foundation for an impressive body of work which deserves to be much better known. Among Prine’s fans were gifted songwriters such as Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and Kris Kristofferson (who namechecked Prine in the title of one of his songs). Prine beat cancer twice, but died of Covid-19 after having had a hip operation.

A Funky Drummer
Disco had many pioneers, but among those who most notably put the stomp on the dancefloor was Hamilton Bohannon. The luxuriously coiffured funkmaster cut his teeth in the 1960s as Little Stevie Wonder’s drummer and then Motown’s tour bandleader. In 1973 he started to release his drum-driven funk under the banner of his surname (occasionally giving his first name an airing). A devout Christian, he saw it necessary to issue a disclaimer to the effect that the title of his album Dance Your Ass Off was not profane.

The Drumming Pioneer
Nigerian drummer Tony Allen is regarded by many of his peers as the greatest exponent of his craft. He was the long-time drummer for Fela Kuti’s Africa ‘70, the outfit that is credited with being the primary founder of Afro-pop, a genre which fused African jazz, traditional African rhythms, US jazz, funk, soul and pop. Kuti said that the genre would not exist without Tony Allen.

The drummer left the band in 1979 to form his own band. In the 1980s he moved to London and then Paris where he backed African acts such Kuti, King Sunny Adé, Ray Lema, Khaled, and Manu Dibango (whom we lost in March), as well as French acts such as Charlotte Gainsbourg and Air, plus Jimmy Cliff, Groove Armada, Kid Creole & The Coconuts, Neil Finn, Grace Jones and, somehow, Irish Foster & Allen. On Blur’s 2000 single Music Is My Radar, Damon Albarn repeats the phrase “Tony Allen got me dancing”. Later Albarn got to collaborate with Allen.

The Award Winner
Another Covid-19 victim was Adam Schlesinger of the underrated Fountains of Wayne. Read more…

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In Memoriam – March 2020

April 2nd, 2020 7 comments

March, a massacre-month, saw several music victims of Covid-19, with an Argentine jazz musician based in Spain being the first casualty, and many others coming after him. Think of them when assholes demand that vulnerable people die to keep the economy going.

The Gambler
We may hope that Kenny Rogers followed the advice of the lyrics of his 1980 hit The Gambler and folded ‘em in his sleep, having previously checked in to see what condition his condition was in. Rogers, who died peacefully at home at the age of 81, has become a byword of commercial country music, with hits such as Lucille, The Gambler, rape-revenge song Coward Of The County, the Lionel Richie-written Lady, the Bob Seger-penned duet with Sheena Easton We’ve Got Tonight, the Dolly Parton duet Islands In The Stream (which the Bee Gees had initially written with Marvin Gaye in mind), and so on.

Rogers started out in 1958 as a fresh-voiced country recording artist, as Kenneth Rogers, before joining a jazz trio. This then led to his membership of the folk outfit New Christy Minstrel Singers, whose members broke away with Kenny to form The First Edition. That group straddled rock and country, having hits with rock numbers and with country covers, such as Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town.

Rogers left The First Edition in 1976 to reboot his career as a country crooner, complete with dad beard and dad glasses, imparting wisdoms about the nature of humankind, and gurning cheerfully in the We Are The World video (he gets to sing the last line of the first verse, “the greatest gift at all”, with Paul Simon, before he briefly takes centrestage with the next line, “We can’t go on pretending day by day”). And Rogers became a flogger of fried chicken, being immortalised in an episode of Seinfeld.

The Jazz Legend
Jazz pianist McCoy Tyner made his name with John Coltrane, on classics such as My Favorite Things and A Love Supreme. While still with Coltrane, Tyner released his own albums, playing more accessible music than that created by the innovator Coltrane. An innovator himself, Tyner continued to release solo albums for many years after parting with Coltrane in late 1965, after five years of close collaboration. His studio final album was released in 2008. He also worked as a sideman with acts like George Benson, Stanley Turrentine, Freddie Hubbard, Donald Byrd, Art Blakey, Milt Jackson, Wayne Shorter.

The Mokassa Man
Perhaps the most prominent victim of the coronavirus this month was Cameroonian saxophone legend Manu Dibango, who passed away at 86. Dibango’s big hit was Soul Mokassa, an early 1970s track that has been widely sampled. Michael Jackson copied the rhythmic vocals of “ma-ma-se, ma-ma-sa, ma-ma-ko-sa” for Wanna Be Startin’ Something, and Rihanna for 2007’s Don’t Stop The Music. But Jackson had used it without Dibango’s permission, and when Rihanna received permission to use the sample from the Jackson song, Dibango sued both. Jackson admitted his plagiarism and settled out of court. Rihanna’s gang got out of paying Dibango due to a legal quirk.

Other elements of Soul Mokassa have been sampled liberally. These include Will Smith’s Getting Jiggy With It, Jay-Z’s Face-Off, Kanye West’s Lost In The World, Mama Say by The Bloodhound Gang, Rhythm (Devoted To The Art Of Moving Butts) by A Tribe Called Quest, and many others.

The First Lady Of Folk
Known as Britain’s “First Lady of Folk” Julie Felix was born in the US and came to the UK in 1964, waving mid-Atlantic at the British invasion going the other way. Felix did little to trouble the charts — she had a #19 and a #22 hit in 1970 — and still she was the first folk singer to sell out the Royal Albert Hall. In 1966 she was the resident singer on David Frosts’ TV programme, The Frost Report, and between 1967 and 1970 hosted her own TV show. Felix kept recording until 2018, when she was 79.

The German-US Friend
The staid German music scene was revolutionised in the early 1980s by the emergence Read more…

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In Memoriam – February 2020

March 4th, 2020 3 comments

When a singing star dies in a prison cell as a guest of his dictatorial regime, you know it has been the kind of shitty month when music and politics intersect. The African state of Rwanda might have a respectable looking president and one of Africa’s economic success stories, but opponents of the regime die in its prison cells…

I was also sad to learn of the death on March 2 at 93 of James Lipton, presenter (and so much more) of Inside The Actors Studio. In his honour, I shall do the 10 Questions he asked of his guests in the comments section.

The National Treasure
Few musicians receive a state funeral with flags flying at half-mast, but that is the way South Africa’s government honoured Joseph Shabalala, the founder and leader of the (mostly) a cappella group Ladysmith Black Mambazo after he died at the age of 78. His group came to worldwide notice when they used their distinctive harmonies to back Paul Simon on his (controversial) Graceland album and tour. They went on to win five Grammys and were nominated for countless more. Amid a punishing touring schedule, they released 50 albums since their hit debut in 1973.

The Last Chordette
The final surviving Chordette has lollipopped. Lynn Evans, who appeared on all the Cadence recordings — that is, the glory days of the vocal group which soundtracks the 1950s so well — reached the ripe age of 95 before Mr Sandman took her to join her erstwhile companions, the first of whom to die was Alice Buschmann in 1981.

The Guitar Cop
To funk aficionados, Harold Beane might be best-known for his guitar work on Funkadelic’s Maggot Brain and other tracks. He also wrote a few tracks for the collective, including the title track of the America Eats Its Young album. He also recorded and/or toured with the likes of Isaac Hayes (including the superb fuzz guitar solo on Walk On By), William Bell, Little Richard, Eddie Floyd, Otis Redding, Al Green and others. A trained policeman, Beane played a prank on his old pal George Clinton and his funky friends in Atlanta in 1996. Donning his police uniform, he went to the hotel where Clinton and entourage stayed. “I knocked on the door and put my finger over the peephole. They opened the door and all they saw was the police uniform and the badge… Man, I heard the toilet flushing!” I’m sure there was abounding mirth.

The Mazzy Star
With his other-worldy guitar scoring the haunting voice of Hope Sandoval on Mazzy Star’s delicate, almost dreamlike 1990s songs, David Roback (possibly unintentionally) influenced many acts that were to come. A product of LA’s post-punk Paisley Underground scene, Roback dabbled in psychedelic throwbacks, first with his band Rain Parade and Opal, and then to some commercial and a lot of critical effect with Mazzy Star.

The Drumming Sidekick
Few backing musicians get honoured to be the referenced in the title of a song of their boss Read more…

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In Memoriam – January 2020

February 4th, 2020 2 comments

This month we lost two hugely influential musicians, but also observe the kindest death one could ask for.

The Doorbreaker
In the late 1950s, folk trio The Kingston Singers kicked open the doors for the folk scene (along with the likes of Burl Ives and Pete Seeger’s Weavers), paving the way for the likes of Odetta and later Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and so on to enter the mainstream. They also inspired the Beach Boys, who would even dress like the Kingston Trio. And all that, in turn, had huge influence on the trajectory of popular music. This month we lost the last surviving member of the original trio, Bob Shane, a few days short of his 85th birthday. Dave Guard and Nick Reynolds died in 1991 and 2008 respectively.

A bonus for fans of The Originals is the featured first version of Honey, recorded by Bob Shane before Bobby Goldsboro had a hit with it, and the Kingston Trio version of Sloop John B, which a few years later the Beach Boys covered. Another Kingston Trio original features in an Originals instalment currently in the works.

The Drumming Great
I must confess, at the risk of inviting passionate hate-mail, that Rush has never been my jam, mainly due to the lead singer’s voice, so my awareness of the genius of drummer Neil Peart was acquired through his reputation. If the likes of Dave Grohl and Stewart Copeland were admirers, and countless other rock drummers drew influence from the man, then you needn’t be a Rush fan to acknowledge that genius. The obituaries have revealed things that were even more interesting than Peart’s drumming exploits. Among them is the story, related in is 1996 book, of how in 1988 he went on a bicycle trip through Cameroon, and ending up giving a hand-drumming performance that drew an audience of a whole village.

The Foot Man
Best-known for his million-selling novelty dance number Barefootin’ (great video here), Robert Parker had a previous career as a saxophonist, playing on tracks like Professor Longhair’s 1949 hit Mardi Gras In New Orleans, and backing the likes of Fats Read more…

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